{{setSearchRegion('mediterranean')}}

Mediterranean

View the Mediterranean Luxury Cruise Collection

Cruise the Western Med from sunny Spain to the glamorous French Riviera, or along Italy's stunning Amalfi Coast from Rome. Discover Croatia's picturesque coast, or explore the diverse and beautiful Greek Islands and Turkish Coast.

Attempts are being made to make the Mediterranean an all-year cruising destination, but most cruises take place between May and October. Highlights of the Western Mediterranean from Spain around to Italy are Monte Carlo and the French Riviera, with some cruises extending into the Central Med to Venice or Dubrovnik and the Croatian coast.

The Eastern Med can be very warm in summer, especially in the Greek islands and the Turkish coast, with much cooler conditions in late autumn and winter.

Mediterranean Port Guide

Acona (Italy)
This city and port is situated south of Ravenna on the east coast of the boot of Italy in the Adriatic. It was founded in 387BC and was a busy trading port with its own Roman coinage, but today it is usually visited as the gateway to the World Heritage Site of Urbino or the Frasassi caves.
Agadir (Morocco)
The port of Agadir is situated at the end of the town's long beach, and during the tourist season there is easy access to local transport into town. The surrounding landscape is dominated by the mountains of the Anti-Atlas and the Sahara Desert, with many quiet beaches along the coast. Agadir beach is lined with cafes, restaurants and hotels, and the Grand Souk is the largest covered market in this region of Morocco. Close by is the walled Berber town of Taroudant.
Ajaccio (Corsica)
Ajaccio's port is adjacent to the town, which is the capital of Corsica and the birthplace of Napoleon. His former home is now a museum, one of a number of attractions which include a museum exhibiting paintings by Raphael, Botticelli and Titian, a palm-fringed promenade and a good selection of chic shops and restaurants. Just along the coast is Cupulatta, a breeding centre for tortoises and turtles.
Alghero (Italy)
Alghero is situated on the north-west coast of Sardinia, bordered along the shore by the walls of its old bastion. This attractive town has numerous restaurants, boutiques and cafes, and shops selling coral jewellery and carvings. The sights include Alghero Cathedral, the Palazzo D'Albis which was once the home of Emperor Charles V, and Neptune's Grotto, one of the most spectacular caves in the Mediterranean.
Alicante (Spain)
Alicante is one of the best-known towns along the Costa Blanca, popular for its long Blue Flag beach, pleasant boulevard and shopping opportunities. The castle of Santa Barbara sits above the town on Mount Benacantil offering good views of the city and coastline, and the town itself has a handsome baroque Town Hall and the blue-domed cathedral of San Nicolas surrounded by gardens.
Almeria (Spain)
Almeria is a pleasant coastal town with a tree-lined waterfront promenade, the quaint streets of Las Ramblas and Paseo de Almeria leading to Almadrabillas beach. Its chief sight is the magnificent Arab fortress of Alcazaba, which contains baths and a Muslim Medina, and the gardens of San Nicolas Salmeron Park. The city also has an imposing fortress cathedral, built to withstand attacks from pirates.
Amalfi (Italy)
Amalfi is one of the most popular resorts along the famous Amalfi coast. It has a superb setting beneath the mountains, and a great deal of charm. The Duomo is a marvel of ancient Arab-Moorish architecture and dominates the lively central piazza, and narrow lanes and steep terraces of brightly-painted houses lead down to the sea, restaurants and fashionable cafes.
Antalya (Turkey)
The delightful town of Antalya has an ancient Roman harbour, now restored and alive with cafes and pleasure boats. There are a superb collection of artefacts in the museum, Ottoman mansions, Byzantine churches and mosques, and a popular Water Park. Hadrian's Gate was once part of walled defenses against pirates and invaders, and below the arch are grooves left behind by carts over the centuries.
Argostolion (Greece)
This is the largest of the Ionian Islands, and is largely unspoilt by tourism. The main port and capital is Argostoli, a modern town with a busy central square, the Plateia Valinou and shops along Lithostroto Street. Cephalonia is famous for the remote, curving arc of Myrtos Beach backed by steep cliffs and the underground lake of Milissani. The most picturesque coastal village is Fiskardo, which is also the oldest settlement on the island.
Arrecife (Lanzarote, Canary Islands)
The lunar landscape of Lanzarote is the result of heavy volcanic activity in the past, and there are 300 dormant volcanoes on the island known as the 'Mountains of Fire', where camel rides are offered through the petrified lava fields. Arrecife is the main port and capital and is close to the beach resort of Puerto del Carmen. Its pretty seafront is bordered by a promenade and gardens leading to the town's bazaar and the shopping district of Calle Leon y Castillo.
Arrecife (Spain)
Arrecife is the busy capital of Tenerife, offering good shopping along the attractive Calle Leon y Castillo, and a popular city beach. In the harbour is the 15th-century fortress of Castillo de San Gabriel, connected to Arrecife by a causeway. Castillo de San Juan displays works by the town's famous artist, Cesar Manrique and also houses a restaurant.
Ashdod (Israel)
The busy commercial port of Ashdod is a gateway to Tel Aviv in the north, and to the Holy Land cities of Jerusalem and Bethlehem. Tel Aviv's collection of over 4000 Bauhaus buildings has earned it a World Heritage listing. Traditional Tel Aviv can be experienced in the Kerem, or Vineyard District which has shady gardens, spice shops and a large market. Visits to Jerusalem may include the Mount of Olives, the Garden of Gethsemane, the Dome of the Rock and perhaps a journey through the Judean Hills to Bethlehem and the Church of the Nativity.
Athens (Greece)
Piraeus is 12 kilometers south-west of Athens and is the city's port. The port town itself has a long nautical history, as told in the Maritime Museum, and close to the port is the area of Piralki and its fish taverns. Walking beyond the peninsula, the coast is dotted with picturesque creeks. The hillside area of Kastella has narrow alleys, the church of Profitis Ilias and fantastic views of the Acropolis.
Barcelona (Spain)
Cruise ships arrive in Barcelona at one of the berths beyond the famous thoroughfare, Las Ramblas. The port provides the low-cost Blue Bus shuttle transfer into the city, where there are world-class museums dedicated to football, history, Picasso, Miro and Gaudi. The skyline of Barcelona is dominated by Gaudi's architecture - the magnificent Sagrada Familia Cathedral, the apartment block of Casa Mila, and at ground level, Parc Guell.
Bari (Italy)
Bari has an interesting mixture of Byzantine, Arab, Gothic and Greek buildings. A wide boulevard runs through the town and the old quarter of Barivecchia is a labyrinth of lanes and arched alleys with pastel-coloured houses. The main sights are the imposing Swabian Castle which now houses exhibitions, the Cathedral of Saint Nicholas, the grand Teatro Piccinni. The chief shopping districts are along the Via Sparano and the Via Argiro.
Bilbao (Spain)
The Basque city of Bilbao has been a busy port since its foundation in the 14th century and today is an interesting blend of ancient and modern buildings. The highlight is the sculpted form of the Guggenheim Museum designed by Frank Gehry, and the famous 12-metre high sculpture of the Flower Puppy by Jeff Koons at its entrance.
Bodrum (Turkey)
Bodrum is a lively port on the Aegean Sea overlooked by the Crusader castle of St Peter. It is a successful combination of modern holiday resort and ancient sites. The hillside is dotted with whitewashed houses, and along the coast are sandy beaches backed by pines and olive groves. Bodrum is home to the Mausoleum of Mausolus, one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World.
Bonifacio (Corsica, France)
When arriving by sea, Bonifacio's Haute Ville is a spectacular sight, a citadel perched on high white cliffs. It has old churches, winding streets with arcades and arches, and upmarket boutiques. There is a small train from the old town at the port up to the Haute Ville, and also boat trips to the grottos and caves along the coast. Alternatively, for a small fee, visitors can take the 187-steps of the 'Staircase of the King of Aragon' from the town to the citadel.
Brindisi (Italy)
The port of Brindisi has a waterfront promenade and a palm-lined avenue leading up from the harbour. Its chief attractions are the Chiesa di Santa Maria del Casale which houses Byzantine frescoes, the two castles at the harbour entrance and the Roman column marking the end of the Appian Way. Brindisi is also the gateway to Arborello and its famous, conical trulli.
Cadiz (Spain)
Cadiz is surrounded on three sides by the sea. The city is dominated by the gold dome of the Baroque Cathedral Nueva, and there are several historic buildings including the mansions around Plaza San Antonio, the Admiral's House and the Tavira Tower. Classical flamenco singing can be heard in the Santa Maria District, and recently opened to the public is the large Roman theatre discovered following a fire in the 1980s.
Cagliari (Sardinia, Italy)
Cagliari in southern Sardinia is an ancient city and the capital of the island. A stroll through the town gives easy access to its historic churches and museums and the winding alleys and piazzas of the old the walled Castello area. There are good views of the bay from Terrazza Umberto I, reached via a grand flight of stairs from Bastione di St Remy, and the town also has a Roman amphitheatre dating back to 2AD.
Cannes (France)
Cruise ship passengers visiting Cannes will arrive in the heart of this glamorous city, well-known for its famous film festival. Beside the attractive promenade of Le Croisette, there are other treasures to discover ' the 14th-century wooden church in the hill-side district of Le Suquet, the arts and crafts galleries of Le Cannet-Rocheville and the small islands of Lerins in the bay where there are sandy beaches and the monastery of Ste Honorat.
Capri (Italy)
The sophisticated island of Capri is situated in the Bay of Naples and is separated into the lower town of Capri and hill-top Anacapri in the west. A funicular railway runs from the port to Capri Town and its attractive square, chic boutiques and restaurants. From here there is a bus service up to Anacapri and the famous Villa San Michele and its gardens. Other sights include the Blue Grotto and Villa Jovis ' the remains of a Roman palace.
Cartagena (Spain)
The port of Cartagena is within walking distance of the town which has been occupied by Romans, Muslims and Arabs during its long history. A long-forgotten Roman theatre was recently rediscovered in the town, which also has Art Nouveau buildings, a grand City Hall and interesting shops along Calle Mayor. A narrow-gauge train carries visitors to the nearby fishing village of Los Nietos and its salt-water lake.
Casablanca (Morocco)
Casablanca's port sits next to one of the city's chief attractions, the huge and impressive Hassan II Mosque completed in 1993. Long boulevards lead to the medina, the Habbous souk district, the mosaics and cedar-carved ceilings of Mahkama du Pacha and an abundance of good traditional and seafood restaurants.
Catania (Italy)
Catania is situated at the foot of Mount Etna on Sicily's east coast and has a long and turbulent history, and numerous impressive buildings, including the baroque Duomo, Teatro Bellini, Ursino Castle and ancient churches and palaces. Amongst the many Roman remains are two theatres, thermal baths and the Odeon, all within the city centre.
Cephalonia (Greece)
This is the largest of the Ionian Islands, and is largely unspoilt by tourism. The main port and capital is Argostoli, a modern town with a busy central square, the Plateia Valinou and shops along Lithostroto Street. Cephalonia is famous for the remote, curving arc of Myrtos Beach backed by steep cliffs and the underground lake of Milissani. The most picturesque coastal village is Fiskardo, which is also the oldest settlement on the island.
Chioggia (Italy)
Chioggia is situated on an island in the Venetian lagoon, and in contrast to Venice, is a simple fishing town with one broad street, the Corso del Popolo which runs the length of the island. Beside the Piazzatta Vigo is a Venetian sculpture of a lion and a 12th-century column, and the church of San Domenico houses works by Tintoretto and Diziani. There are several fish restaurants along the main street.
Chios (Greece)
Chios is well-known for its wild jasmine and a cluster of medieval villages, the Mastihochoria. Mesta, a castle-village, is little-changed since the 14th century and Pyrgi has uniquely decorated black and white plastered houses. Chios is also renowned for the World Heritage Site of Nea Moni, an 11th-century monastery with wonderful mosaics. The prettiest region of the island is Kambos, a green valley where the Genoese built their villas among citrus groves and ancient cisterns.
Constanta
On the west coast of the Black Sea, Constanta has a history stretching back over two thousand years. Remains of the city's Roman baths and fabulous mosaics can be seen in Piata Ovidiu, and the Genovese House with Lions is worth a visit, as is the Art Nouveau casino overlooking the sea. Some of the remains of the ancient city of Tomis survive in front of Constanta's cathedral.
Constanta (Romania)
On the west coast of the Black Sea, Constanta has a history stretching back over two thousand years. Remains of the city's Roman baths and fabulous mosaics can be seen in Piata Ovidiu, and the Genovese House with Lions is worth a visit, as is the Art Nouveau casino overlooking the sea. Some of the remains of the ancient city of Tomis survive in front of Constanta's cathedral.
Corfu (Greece)
Corfu Town, or Kerkyra, is the charming port for the lovely island of Corfu. There are many restaurants and shops radiating out from Kapodistra and the elegant, colonnaded Liston building. Overlooking the harbour is the palaia Anaktora, formerly the residence of British-Greek royalty. Paleokastritsa has lovely beaches backed by olive, cypress and lemon trees, and one of Corfu's key sights is the handsome Palace of Achilleion and its gardens.
Corinth Canal (Greece)
The Corinth Canal connects the Gulf of Corinth with the Saronic Gulf and the Aegean Sea, allowing ships to avoid a journey of 430 miles around the Peloponnese Peninsula. It is almost 4 miles long, with steep cliff walls reaching a height of 52 meters. The journey through the canal is dramatic, as the width of the water is just 79 feet, and most vessels must be boarded by the pilot and towed by a Tugboat.
Delos (Greece)
The sacred and uninhabited isle of Delos is one of the most important archaeological sites in Greece. It was a holy sanctuary where death and birth were forbidden by the Delphic Oracle, and the impressive remains lead off from the Sacred Way and include the Maritime Quarter, Terrace of Lions, the House of Dionysus and the Sanctuary of Apollo.
Dubrovnik (Croatia)
The red-roofed city of Dubrovnik can be admired from the walkway along its 10th century walls. Below, the elegant, marble-paved Stradun leads to colourful caf's, St Blaise's church, Sponza Palace and the cloistered Franciscan Monastery housing a pharmacy which has been in use since 1316.
Fuerteventura (Canary Islands)
Fuerteventura is the second largest of the Canary Islands, and has the longest beaches in the archipelago, a mixture of white sand and black volcanic shingle. The island is generally regarded as the most pristine of the Canaries, and is a Biosphere Reserve crossed by volcanic peaks and edged with wide dunes. The most popular areas are situated away from the capital and port of Puerto del Rosario, the prettiest being Betancuria, where restaurants serve traditional food and there are the remains of a 15th-century monastery.
Genoa (Italy)
The port city of Genoa has many historic churches and a renovated harbour area housing shops and restaurants and Il Bigo, a panoramic lift . Bordering Piazza de Ferrari is the 14th-century Palace of the Doges, and along the Via Garibaldi are several mansions now open to the public. For wonderful views, visit the cliff-top Forte Sperone or climb the 375 steps of the Lanterna Lighthouse.
Gibraltar
The small British territory of Gibraltar is an interesting mixture of British and Spanish cultures, consisting of the famous Rock and a narrow spit of land between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean. It is famous for the cliff-top colony of Barbary Apes reached by cable car, the Siege Tunnels built during World War II, St Michael's Cave and its unusual auditorium and a variety of shops selling tax-free goods. There are buses and a shuttle service from the port to the town.
Gijon (Spain)
The small harbour of Gijon divides the town into two ' the main town and the older quarter of Cimadevilla where the houses of the original fishing village still remain and are well-preserved. The beach resort is centred around Playa del San Lorenzo and several shopping malls and restaurants. There are some museums of interest, including the International Bagpipe Museum and the Roman Archaeological Park of Campa de Torres.
Haifa (Israel)
Haifa is one of Israel's prettiest cities, crowned by Mount Carmel. There are several interesting sights, including the lush gardens of the Carmel Nature Reserve, the cave of the Prophet Elijah and the former German Colony, established in 1868 as an agricultural community and now one of Haifa's most picturesque areas. Wadi Nisnas is a network of narrow alleys, restaurants, old stone houses and Turkish haanim which is occupied by Jews and Arabs.
Heraklion (Crete)
The town of Heraklion has a picturesque harbour, tree-shaded squares and a splendid Venetian loggia and fountains. Boutiques can be found on Daedalou Street, and curios and gifts along 1866 Street. Koules Venetian Fortress is situated on the harbour walls close to the Natural History Museum of Crete, where visitors can stand on the 'experience an earthquake' platform. The famous Minoan Palace of Knossos is only 25 minutes' drive from Heraklion.
Hvar (Croatia)
Hvar is a picturesque island on the Dalmatian Riviera, with good bathing beaches and a harbour backed by a hillside of terracotta-tiled houses. There are views of the sea and surrounding islets from the Fortica fortress, and the Franciscan monastery houses a museum exhibiting 16th-century paintings. Also in the town is the Cathedral of St Stephan, the unfinished Gothic palace of Hekrotivic, and a palm-fringed waterfront with seafood restaurants.
Hydra (Greece)
This interesting island has no roads or vehicles, and the only transportation is by donkey. It has a wild and sparsely populated interior, and some magnificent mansions built by 19th-century shipping magnets. In the 50s and 60s it was a favourite haunt for artists, among them Leonard Cohen, who were inspired by its natural beauty. There are coves and beaches close to Hydra Town.
Ibiza (Spain)
Best known for its summer club parties, Ibiza is a picturesque island with an historic old town, Dalt Vila, reached via a drawbridge and the impressive gateway of Portal de Ses Taules. There are many gift shops, art galleries and excellent restaurants, and a 14th-century cathedral. Ibiza is the third-largest of the Balearic Islands and has good beaches and an inland terrain speckled with fig and olive trees. To the south are the white salt fields of Las Salinas.
Istanbul
It is often said that Istanbul is where east meets west, and there are numerous places of interest in the Old City, opposite the port. The highlights are the Grand Bazaar, Hagia Sophia and the landmark of the city, the Blue Mosque, which is decorated with blue Iznik tiles and houses a market, public kitchen and theological school. The palace of the Ottoman Sultans, Topkapi, houses sacred Muslim relics including the Prophet Mohammed's cloak and sword.
Istanbul (Turkey)
It is often said that Istanbul is where east meets west, and there are numerous places of interest in the Old City, opposite the port. The highlights are the Grand Bazaar, Hagia Sophia and the landmark of the city, the Blue Mosque, which is decorated with blue Iznik tiles and houses a market, public kitchen and theological school. The palace of the Ottoman Sultans, Topkapi, houses sacred Muslim relics including the Prophet Mohammed's cloak and sword.
Izmir (Turkey)
Izmir is surrounded by mountains on Turkey's scenic Aegean coast and has some of the region's best beaches. Below the modern skyline along the waterfront are Gustav Eiffel's Konak Pier and the attractive Pasaport Quay. Founded by Alexandra the Great, there are many interesting sights, including the Agora, the lovely Clock Tower near the pier, the old Kemeralti bazaar and the castle of Sancakkale.
Katakolon (Greece)
The small seaside town of Katakolon has a beach at the end of the pier, and tavernas and bars along the waterfront. It is used as the gateway to the ancient site of Olympia, 35 kilometers away, which is where the Olympic Games began.
Kephalonia (Greece)
This is the largest of the Ionian Islands, and is largely unspoilt by tourism. The main port and capital is Argostoli, a modern town with a busy central square, the Plateia Valinou and shops along Lithostroto Street. Cephalonia is famous for the remote, curving arc of Myrtos Beach backed by steep cliffs and the underground lake of Milissani. The most picturesque coastal village is Fiskardo, which is also the oldest settlement on the island.
Khania (Crete, Greece)
The Venetian harbour and town of Chania on Crete is an historic area with a thriving nightlife and waterfront restaurants. The Old Town area of Kastli is interwoven with narrow alleys and pretty balconied houses. Aside from the pleasure of exploring this picturesque town, places of interest include the Byzantine Museum, the Ottoman Baths and the Fortress of Souda on an island in the bay.
Koper (Slovenia)
Koper has a well-preserved and compact medieval centre with quaint narrow streets, and is Slovenia's main port. The symbol of the city is the lovely Praetorian Palace, which is situated in the picturesque main square. One of Koper's oldest buildings is the 12th-century church of Carmine Rotunda which contains a series of 14th-century frescoes. Across the bay is the resort of Ankaran and its sandy beaches.
Korcula (Croatia)
Korcula is a forested island with a charming old walled town of Venetian and Renaissance buildings. Enter through one of the city gates to see delightful squares and narrow alleys, which lead to the house where Marco Polo is said to have been born and the Cathedral of St Mark. Caf's along the city walls look out across the blue Adriatic
Kos (Greece)
The island of Kos has long been a popular destination and has good facilities for tourists. It lies just off the Turkish coast, with mountainous terrain and good sandy beaches. Kos Town has a mixture of ancient, medieval and modern buildings, with broad, leafy streets. Connected to the town and harbour by a bridge is the 14th-century Castle of the Knights of Saint John. South of the town is the Asklepieion, the ruins of an ancient Greek centre of medicine.
Kotor (Montenegro)
The lovely fortified town of Kotor sits in a dramatic bay surrounded by limestone massifs in a magnificent region of Montenegro. Kotor's city walls enclose a well-preserved medieval centre, designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site. St Tryphon's Cathedral is decorated with 14th-century frescoes.
Kusadasi (Turkey)
The large port of Kusadasi is also a tourist resort, and has a lively nightlife, a long palm-lined boulevard and numerous sandy beaches offering watersports, including the best-known, Ladies Beach. Calls to Kusadasi usually include a visit to the magnificent and well-preserved site of Ephesus, 18 kilometers away.
La Coruna (Spain)
La Coruna is a busy port on the north-west coast of Spain in the province of Galicia and one of the gateways to the pilgrimage site of Santiago de Compostela. The port is close to the World Heritage listed Tower of Hercules, built by the Romans in 2AD and the oldest working lighthouse in the world. Leading off from La Coruna's seafront promenade are medieval churches and baroque palaces.
La Goulette (Tunisia)
La Goulette has a long promenade and restaurants serving fresh fish and traditional mutton dishes, and is the port for Tunis where you will find the exotic shops and narrow lanes of the medina. Tunis is also well-known for the Bardo Museum and its outstanding collection of mosaics, the 16th-century Kasbah fortress, and the hill-top town of Sidi Bou Said, which is a relaxing oasis of courtyards and bright Mediterranean colours.
La Pallice (La Rochelle, France)
La Pallice is the port for La Rochelle, where the harbour is too shallow to accommodate cruise vessels. It was a large submarine base during World War II and its bunker was used as a location for 'Indiana Jones II' and 'Das Boot'. La Pallice is close to the aquarium of La Rochelle and its historic, fortified Old Town.
La Spezia (Italy)
La Spezia is situated at the head of the so-called Bay of Poets, where Byron and Shelley lived. It is close to Portovenere and the popular ports of the Cinque Terre, which can be reached by train or boat from La Spezia. The town has a palm-lined promenade, an unusual 13th-century church, Santa Maria Assunta, and a Museum of Seals with exhibits dating from the 4th century BC.
Las Palmas (Gran Canaria, Canary islands)
This 15th-century city is the capital of Gran Canaria and has many colonial buildings, and a picturesque setting between the beaches of Playa de las Canteras and Playa de las Alcaravaneras. The city's historic district, Vegueta, is a World Heritage Site where sophisticated boutiques and a cosmopolitan atmosphere make Las Palmas a popular tourist destination.
Limassol (Cyprus)
The city of Limassol on the south coast of Cyprus is one of the largest ports in the Mediterranean and also the largest tourist resort on the island, with pleasant beaches, tavernas and cafes. Above Kourion Beach are the ruins of a Roman amphitheatre, and the Cyprus Medieval Museum is situated in the Castle of Limassol. Close to the town are the ruins of Amathus and the former headquarters of the Knights of St John of Jerusalem, Kolossi Castle.
Lisbon (Portugal)
Lisbon has three ports, all with taxi services and within 3 kilometers of the city centre. Lisbon is a sprawling city which has been occupied by Visigoths, Moors, Romans and Celts. Alfama and Barrio Alto are historic districts of cobbled streets, wrought-iron balconies and Moorish buildings. Its most famous landmarks are the World Heritage Sites of Belem Tower and the impressive 16th-century Jeronimos Monastery.
Livorno (Pisa/Florence, Italy)
Large ships visiting Livorno dock a short distance from this town on the western coast of Tuscany. It has a long seafront stretching to Antignano, edged with trees and Art Nouveau villas. The Venezia Nuova quarter is an area of canals, bridges and the handsome 17th-century buildings of Via Borra. Livorno has good rail links to Florence, Pisa and Lucca.
Madeira
The lush island of Madeira is known as the 'Garden Isle' of Portugal, with exotic flowers and tropical vegetation covering its steep slopes. The port and capital of Funchal has a mountains backdrop, and its attractions include a wicker-sledge ride down a cobbled mountain track from Monte, and the beautiful Botanical Gardens. There are cafes, bars and restaurants in the city centre, and modern shopping centres.
Mahon (Menorca, Spain)
Mahon is the capital of Menorca, and has a lively harbour with market stalls and plenty of cafes. The old quarter has a mixture of English Georgian buildings and Catalan architecture. Worthy of a visit are the Ateneo Cientifico, a museum of natural history, archaeology and art, and the Church of Santa Maria in Plaza de la Constitucion. The island has many attractive crescent-shaped beaches with good swimming ' popular spots are Arenal den Castell and Cala den Porter.
Malaga (Spain)
Malaga cruise port is situated at the end of the town's promenade. Sitting on a sweeping Andalucian bay, Malaga has long been popular as a beach resort, and has plenty of attractions for visitors. Walk its wide palm-shaded boulevards, narrow streets and squares and discover the Museo Picasso which honours one of Malaga's most famous sons, Alcazaba Fortress and a nearby Roman amphitheatre, and an impressive cathedral.
Marmaris (Turkey)
The lively resort and modern port of Marmaris is based around the original Old Town and its fort. Along the seafront is a promenade, and several marinas offering sailing and diving facilities. The Old Town area has a traditional Grand Bazaar, Turkish Baths in the Cami Aylu district and a small caravanserai, an old inn for travellers and their animals. Marmaris Castle was built by Suleyman the Magnificent and now houses galleries and exhibition halls.
Marseille (France)
Marseille's busy new port is a bus ride away from the city, where there are a variety of shops, the Byzantine cathedral of Notre Dame, and Palais du Pharo were Napoleon III once lived. Vieux Port is the historic waterfront area, and boats take visitors to Chateu d'If which featured in 'The Count of Monte Cristo'.
Messina (Italy)
This ancient city of cobblestone streets sits on the north-eastern tip of Sicily, and is a busy port a short walk away for the main Piazza and its Duomo. Messina is usually visited as a gateway to the classical ruins of Taormina, tours to Mount Etna and the Church of the Black Madonna in Tindari.
Monte Carlo (Monaco)
The cruise ship terminal in Monte Carlo is within walking distance of the town, a glitzy and sophisticated destination well-known for its Grand Prix and the Grand Casino, and for the sleek yachts in its harbour. There are numerous boutiques, the imposing St Nicholas Cathedral, and the hill-top Royal Palace.
Motril (Spain)
Motril is the second-largest town in the Spanish province of Granada. Scenically situated against a mountain backdrop, the town has an interesting Mudejar church, and a Baroque Town Hall. There are two popular beaches, Playa Granada and Playa Poniente.
Mykonos (Greece)
Mykonos is one of the most fashionable and cosmopolitan of the Greek islands. Its hills are dotted with white-washed cube houses and churches, and the thatched windmills for which the island is famous. Pink pelicans are often spotted from the waterfront tavernas. The main sight in the town is lovely white domed Parportiani Church, which incorporates 5 separate buildings. The cruise port is a mile north of Mykonos Town, where ferries make the 40-minute journey to the sacred island of Delos.
Mytilene (Lesbos, Greece)
Lesbos is Greece's third-largest island and lies just off the coast of Turkey, with its port adjacent to the town of Mytilene. There is a miniature version of the Statue of Liberty in the harbour, and the landscape is green and fertile. Sights include a Roman aqueduct, an interesting Petrified Forest created during a volcanic eruption, thermal springs and sea caves, and an excellent museum in Mytilene.
Naples (Italy)
The city of Naples is a maze of architectural treasures and busy streets in the shadow of Mount Vesuvius. Among the key sights are the 13th-century Duomo, the Royal Palace, the Teatro San Carlo, and the underground tunnels of the Napoli Sotteranea. The chief shopping areas are Piazza dei Martiri, Via Calabritto, and the glass arcade of Galleria Umberto. Naples is also the gateway to the remains of ancient Pompeii.
Nauplia (Greece)
Nafplion is one of Greece's most attractive towns with narrow streets, elegant Venetian houses and neoclassical mansions. On a high cliff overlooking the harbour is the Palamidi Fortress, built by the Venetians in the 15th century and accessible by a flight of 857 steps. Bourtzi Castle sits on an island in the bay, and hosts the summer music festival. Calls to Nafplion might include a visit to the ancient site of Mycenae.
Nice (France)
Nice port is situated in the heart of the city, close to the old quarter. The bay is bordered by the sweeping Promenade des Anglais which leads to a pedestrianised zone housing restaurants, cafes, small shops and boutiques and the pleasant Place Rossetti. There is a Russian Orthodox Cathedral in Nice, and excellent museums, including two dedicated to the works of Matisse and Chagall.
Odessa
The port of Odessa is the largest in the Ukraine. The city is leafy and has a faded elegance, with Art Nouveau buildings, courtyards and landscaped parks. The famous Potemkin Stairs lead up from the waterfront to World Heritage-listed Prymorsky Boulevard and the magnificent Opera House, which has a richly decorated red and gold interior. Along Arcadia Beach there are some of the spas and sanitariums for which Odessa is famous.
Odessa (Ukraine)
The port of Odessa is the largest in the Ukraine. The city is leafy and has a faded elegance, with Art Nouveau buildings, courtyards and landscaped parks. The famous Potemkin Stairs lead up from the waterfront to World Heritage-listed Prymorsky Boulevard and the magnificent Opera House, which has a richly decorated red and gold interior. Along Arcadia Beach there are some of the spas and sanitariums for which Odessa is famous.
Olbia (Sardinia, Italy)
Olbia is the main port on the island of Sardinia, situated close to the scenic Costa Smerelda. Olbia has good facilities for tourists ' cafes and internet cafes, restaurants and bars. Olbia is best known for its recently discovered shipwrecks, dating back to 5AD, its old town walls, and the Romanesque church of San Simplicio.
Opatija (Croatia)
The town of Opatija was one of the earliest resorts on the Adriatic coast. It is backed by Ucka Mountain and woodland and has many graceful villas and a seaside promenade with a well-known statue, the 'Maiden with the Seagull'. The Park of St Jakov has 159 plant species including exotic examples from the Far east, South America and Australia, and a 15th-century church of the same name.
Oporto
Oporto's sea port is located in Leixoes at the mouth of the River Douro and five miles north of the city, whilst river cruise vessels can access Oporto directly. Oporto is the hub of the port wine trade, and vineyards line the shores of the river upstream. Old Oporto is a World Heritage Site with houses dating back to the 15th-century, a grand cathedral, a train station decorated with fine examples of Portugal's blue and white tiles and the remains of Roman city walls.
Palermo (Italy)
The port of Palermo sits on the north-west coast of Sicily, and is a ten-minute walk from the city centre, which is rich in history, architecture and culture. There are many historic buildings ' the largest theatre in Italy, the Teatro Massimo, the cathedral, which contains an observatory in one of its domes, the catacombs of the Capuchins housing remains of 8000 monks, and the Museo Archeologico Regionale. Local buses travel to Mount Etna where there is a cable car taking visitors up to the craters.
Palma (Mallorca)
Palma is Mallorca's elegant city. The port is overlooked by the impressive cathedral, behind which is the old town, its boutiques and squares. Shops can be found around the attractive Placa Major and the Passeig des Born, and the ornate Olivar Market is worth a visit for its flower and fruit displays. There are several places of interest ' the Arab Baths, the fortified palace of La Almudaina, the mural by Joan Miro in Parc del Mar and circular Bellver Castle, perched above the city on a hill.
Paros (Greece)
Whitewashed cube houses, narrow paved alleys and wild flowers make Paros one of the most popular of the Cyclades. Cafes line the main street of the capital and port, Parikia, where the Monastery of the Hundred Doors was built in 4AD by Eleni the mother of Emperor Constantin. The white marble mined on Paros was used by sculptors in antiquity, notably for the Venus de Milo.
Patmos (Greece)
Skala is the pretty harbour of Patmos, built below the fortified monastery and the Sacred Grotto where St John wrote the Book of Revelation, both open to visitors. It is easy to get around by boat or bus, and around the harbour there are numerous picturesque tavernas and a few nightclubs. Beaches can be found at nearby Grikos and Diakofti.
Piraeus (Athens, Greece)
Piraeus is 12 kilometers south-west of Athens and is the city’s port. The port town itself has a long nautical history, as told in the Maritime Museum, and close to the port is the area of Piralki and its fish taverns. Walking beyond the peninsula, the coast is dotted with picturesque creeks. The hillside area of Kastella has narrow alleys, the church of Profitis Ilias and fantastic views of the Acropolis.
Ponta Delgada (Azores, Portugal)
Ponta Delgada on the island of Sao Miguel is the pretty and historic capital of the Azores In the former monastery of Santo Andre is the Carlos Machado Museum, and Porta Delgada is a good base for tours to the lush interior, the extinct volcano of Caldeira das Sete Cidades and its two lakes. Also worth a visit is the botanical garden of Jardim Jose do Canto and Praca Goncala Velho Square, where there are shady cafes and the remains of the city walls.
Portimao (Portugal)
Portimao is one of the biggest towns on the Algarve, and sits next to the busy and popular resort of Priaia da Rocha and its beaches. Portimao itself has a good choice of restaurants, offers various watersports activities and has a newly-developed waterfront. There are numerous shops, a mixture of local and international stores. Nearby are golf courses, the Caves of Estombar and the Roman villa at Figueira.
Porto (Portugal)
Oporto's sea port is located in Leixoes at the mouth of the River Douro and five miles north of the city, whilst river cruise vessels can access Oporto directly. Oporto is the hub of the port wine trade, and vineyards line the shores of the river upstream. Old Oporto is a World Heritage Site with houses dating back to the 15th-century, a grand cathedral, a train station decorated with fine examples of Portugal's blue and white tiles and the remains of Roman city walls.
Porto Cervo (Sardinia, Italy)
Porto Cervo is a new village and port in northern Sardinia and a key destination on the upmarket Costa Smerelda, built by Luigi Vietti in the 1960s under the direction of the Aga Khan IV. Although new, the white-painted buildings are attractive and unusual ' the church of Stella Maris is worth a visit. As befits this glamorous destination, there are plenty of nightclubs, expensive boutiques and excellent restaurants.
Porto Rotondo (Sardinia, Italy)
Porto Rotondo is an exclusive seaside village on Sardinia's Costa Smerelda, close to Mount Ladu and the glamorous coastal resort of Porto Cervo. The coastline is lush and edged with white sand beaches, including Ira, Sassi and Marinella. In the village, Piazzetta San Marco is the place to go for bars and expensive boutiques. Buildings of interest include the church of San Lorenzo and its wooden statues and a granite amphitheatre built in the Greek style. Silvio Berlusconi has a luxurious villa nearby.
Portofino (Italy)
This beautiful Italian Riviera town has been favoured by the rich and famous for decades. It is built on a hillside sloping down to the sea and its easily recognizable harbour of brightly-painted houses. There are pleasant walks through the olive groves into Portofino National Park and to the gardens and terrace of 15th-century Castello Brown. Sea taxis depart from Portofino for the attractive towns of the Cinque Terre.
Positano (Italy)
Positano is one of a string of picturesque fishing villages on the Amalfi Coast. Its houses cling to the hillside and cobbled streets and steep stairways criss-cross the village, which was the backdrop for scenes from 'The Talented Mr Ripley'. The church of Santa Maria Assunta has a colourful majolica-tiled dome and there is an attractive Town Hall. Boat trips take visitors to the sea cave of the Emerald Grotto and ferries depart for the islands of Ischia and Capri and the ancient site of Paestum.
Ravenna (Italy)
Ravenna was the last capital of the Roman Empire and later became the centre of the Byzantine world. Ravenna is famous for its mosaics from these periods which can be seen in the Basilicas of Sant Apollinare Nuovo and San Vitale, and also for the tomb of the poet Dante. It is also a busy and modern port with shops, cafes and restaurants just a few minutes walk from the centre of the city.
Rhodes (Greece)
Rhodes port in the ancient Mandraki harbour is next to the walled Old Town with shops, restaurants and chief sights all within walking distance. These include the Palace of the Grand Masters built by the Knights of St John, the Sulemain Mosque, Byzantine churches, Venetian mansions and old Crusader inns along the Street of the Knights. The famous Acropolis of Rhodes on a hillside beyond the city is not to be missed.
Rijeka (Croatia)
Rijeka is a busy port at the northern tip of the Croatian coast, almost untouched by tourism. The main shopping street is the Corso, where there are cafes and fountains. The oldest structure in Rijeka is a stone archway which was once the entrance to a Roman centre of command, and also of interest is the Maritime and Historical Museum. It is housed in a former palace and exhibits nautical, Roman and Greek archaeological finds.
Rome (Civitavecchia, Italy)
This busy port is a hub for travel throughout the Mediterranean and has direct rail connections to Rome. In Civitavecchia itself, there is a seafront promenade and beach, a long modern pier and the Archaeological Park of Terme Taurine, where there are Roman baths built by Emperor Hadrian around hot sulphur springs. The town has a good choice of seafood restaurants, and a few kilometers down the coast is the important 9th-century castle of Santa Severa, built on the ancient site of Pyrgi.
Rovinj (Croatia)
The first view of Rovinj from the sea is the much-photographed Riva waterfront and its brightly-painted houses, and the bell-tower of Saint Eufemia's Church which can be climbed for wonderful views of the town and the picturesque islands along the coast. Narrow cobbled streets lead up to the old town from the harbour, where three ancient defensive gates survive. Red Island and its beaches can be reached in 15 minutes by boat from Rovinj.
Saint Tropez (France)
The port of St Tropez is in the heart of this sophisticated town, which is a by-word for glitz and glamour and a paradise for shopping and people-watching. Historically, St Tropez was a military stronghold and a small fishing village ' some of its old charm remains in narrow lanes and the Provencal market, the citadel and castle. There is a scenic coastal path leading to small beaches and ancient ruins.
Salerno (Italy)
Salerno is situated at the northern-most end of the Amalfi coast. A short distance from the busy port is a long and picturesque seafront promenade shaded by palm trees, and the town has many palaces including the Baroque Palazzo Morese. Opposite is the fine Cathedral which contains the elaborately decorated crypt of St Matthew. Salerno is often visited as a gateway to the Amalfi coastal villages and the ancient sites of Paestum and Pompeii.
San Sebastian (La Gomera, Canary Islands)
The capital of La Gomera, San Sebastian consists of tiers of cube-shaped houses rising up from the harbour. Close to the Iglesia de la Virgen de las Suncion is the Playa de San Sebastian, the place for bars, bodega restaurants and specialist shops. Christopher Columbus is believed to have lived in the Casa de Colon which is now open to the public. The 15th-century Torre del Conde tower is a military structure with connections to Columbus and the oldest building on the island.
Santa Cruz (La Palma, Canary Islands)
La Palma is a mountainous and scenic island with an impressive volcanic crater, Caldera de Taburiente, and black volcanic sand beaches. The pretty town of Santa Cruz is the capital and main port, famous for its wooden balconies, cobbled streets, ancient buildings and the replica of Columbus' ship, the Santa Maria, which houses the Maritime Museum.
Santa Cruz (Tenerife, Canary Islands)
Santa Cruz is the capital of the largest of the Canary Islands, Tenerife. It is a modern city with several attractions including Garcia Sanabria Park where there are sculptures by Joan Miro and Henry Moore, the colonial church of La Concepcion and the modernist Opera House. In Loro Parque there are tropical gardens and an aquarium housing sea lions, sharks and penguins.
Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain)
This is one of the prettiest towns in the Canary Islands and the capital of La Palma. It's a short walk from the port to the colonial centre, where 16th-century buildings close to Avenida Puente are decorated with brightly-painted balconies. In the palm-shaded Plaza Espana is the lovely Iglesia del Salvador and restaurants and shops line Calle O'Dally. Tall ships often call at the harbour, where the Maritime Museum is housed in a reconstruction of Columbus's ship the Santa Maria.
Santa Margherita (Italy)
Once a fishing village, Santa Margherita is now a very attractive resort town, and unusually for this area of the Italian coast has fine sandy beaches. Around the harbour are gelaterie, boutiques, cafes and restaurants, and the elegant arcaded buildings painted in shades of ochre which are typical of the Italian Riviera. Villa Durazzo was the venue for the weddings of Wayne Rooney and Rod Stewart, and its gardens are a public park.
Santorini (Greece)
The best way to arrive in Santorini is by sea, with spectacular views of the high caldera walls and the cliff-top town of Fira. Cruise ships berth in the old port, where the journey to the town is via donkey or cable car ' either option provides dramatic views of the Mediterranean and the volcanic island of Nea Kameni. Along the narrow alleys of the cliff-top are brilliant white and blue buildings, and the much-photographed church of Ag Mina.
Savona (Italy)
The 14th-century tower of La Torretta overlooks the busy container and cruise port of Savona, which is situated on the Italian coast north of Corsica. In the town is the Piazza Marnelli with an impressive monument to the casualties of the First World War, the 16th-century Cathedral and beyond, the impressive hillside fortress of Priamar. In the Savona Hills is the cottage where Christopher Columbus lived and farmed whilst writing about his journeys.
Sevilla (Spain)
The city of Seville on the Guadalquivir River can be reached by river cruise ships. Passengers aboard larger sea-going vessels can visit Seville from the ports of Sanlucar de Barrameda or Cadiz. Dating back 2000 years, its architecture spans Moorish, Mudejar and Gothic periods. Tapas bars and restaurants are spread across this very attractive city, and sights include the magnificent cathedral, the nearby 9th-century Alcazar and
Sibenik (Croatia)
Sibenik is one of Croatia`s oldest cities, where the sights include the City Square, the Dukes and Bishop's Palaces and a Venetian Loggia, reached via the steep winding alleys of the Old Town. The highlight of a visit to Sibenik is the World Heritage-listed Renaissance cathedral of St James, built in 1434 and situated below the town's fortress walls. The city region of Dolac is peppered with lively cafes and restaurants serving local specialities.
Sorrento (Italy)
Sorrento lies on a peninsula on the south side of the Bay of Naples, and is the gateway to the picturesque Amalfi Coast, the islands of Ischia and Capri, and the ancient sites of Pompeii and Paestum. Sorrento itself has an unhurried charm, with cafes serving the local tipple, Limoncello in Piazza Tasso. Worth a visit are the Baroque Church del Carmine, the 18th-century villa, Palazzo Correa, and Museo Bottega, which has frescoed vaults and antiquities on display.
Split (Croatia)
The World Heritage Site of Split is a bustling city and the second largest in Croatia. It gradually developed around the palace of the Roman Emperor Diocletian, built more than 1700 years ago and incorporating columns and sphinxes from Egypt. Remarkably it still thrives today, housing restaurants, shops and markets. Within the palace is the Peristile, a colonnaded square, and the cathedral. Split's Archaeological Museum exhibits Roman artefacts including coins, and reliefs of mythical figures.
Tangier (Morocco)
Tangier is one of the largest ports in Africa, and cruise passengers arrive in the centre of the city. The Grand Socco leads to the Kasbah, which has views across the Straits of Gibraltar. It contains buildings from many periods and the Dar el Makhzeh, the old Sultan's palace which now houses an art collection. In the medina is the American Legation Museum, displaying old maps and antique carpets. Tangier is an important Berber city.
Taormina (Italy)
The port for Taormina is Giardini Naxos, whilst Taormina town sits high above the bay on the flanks of Monte Tauro and can be reached by taxi, shuttle bus or a cable car from Mazzaro Bay. The medieval town has elegant boutiques and restaurants along Corso Umberto, a 13th-century Duomo, Palazzo Corvaja and lush public gardens. The chief sight is the idyllically situated Greek amphitheatre with views of snow-capped Mount Etna.
Tartous (Syria)
Tartous was a Phoenician town later claimed by the Crusaders, and the walls of their fortress and its moat remain. There are pretty hill towns nearby, and the magnificent Crusader fortress of Krak des Chevaliers. This formidable construction stands on a hill, and was the centre of activity for the Knights Hospitalier during the Crusades - the Grand Master's room is accessed via a spiral staircase.
Tenerife (Canary Islands)
Tenerife is dominated by 3718-metre high Mount Teide, the highest mountain in Spain, which can be accessed by cable car for stunning views of the other Canary Islands. The large variety of landscapes range from lush valleys, banana plantations and the moon-like white rock formations of the Lorno Blanco. In the Ethnographic Park are the mysterious stepped pyramids of Guimar, built along the same lines as those of Mexico and Peru.
Thessaloniki (Greece)
Thessaloniki is a free port and one of the Aegean's largest, being the trade hub of the Balkans and the cruising gateway to the eastern Mediterranean. This sophisticated city has several attractions, among them the Roman Place of Galerius, large squares beside the waterfront, traditional tavernas and an excellent Archaeology Museum.
Toulon (France)
The Provencal port of Toulon has a long history, and its military harbour, fortifications and shipyard were developed under the direction of Cardinal Richelieu and later, Vauban. The town is known for its elegant fountains, its Provencal market held daily on the Cours Lafayette and the elaborate Toulon Opera House. The old town has narrow streets and small squares, whilst the upper town was built on a grand scale by the same architect who re-built Paris.
Trapani (Sicily)
Trapani is the western-most fishing and ferry port on the island of Sicily, and was founded in 260BC. It is renowned for its seafood and traditional Sicilian cuisine and although many of the old buildings were destroyed during World War II, some fine palaces survive along the Corso Vittorio Emanuel. The Chieasa del Purgatorio houses the Misteri, the sculptures carried through the town during its famous Good Friday procession, and there are several interesting churches including the Sanctuary of Annunziata.
Trieste (Italy)
The busy port of Trieste is not far from the city centre and the large and grand Piazza Unita d'Italia. Trieste has many neo-classical buildings and old palaces, the famous pastry and chocolate shop, La Bomboniera and the historic Caffe San Marco, once frequented by James Joyce. Roman remains in Trieste include the Arch of Riccardo, the Basilica Forense and an amphitheatre.
Triluke Bay (Croatia)
This small cove on Korcula Island has three peaceful beaches backed by pine forests and is used as a stop for swimming and relaxing, perhaps with visits to some of the surrounding villages.
Tripoli (Libya)
This historic city is the capital of Libya. Tripoli's old-town skyline is dominated by the palace complex of the Red Castle, and other sights include the medina, the Arch of Marcus Aurelius and the Gurgi Mosque, decorated with intricate and colourful tiles. Tripoli is often visited for excursions to the Carthaginian city of Sabratha.
Tunis (Tunisia)
Cruise ships visiting Tunis often use the port of La Goulette, which has good train links to the city 15 minutes' journey away. La Goulette has a long promenade and restaurants serving fresh fish and traditional mutton dishes. Tunis itself is famous for the prestigious Bardo Museum and its mosaics, the soukh and the hill-top town of Sidi Bou, which has upmarket cafes overlooking the Bay of Tunis, and attractive blue and white-painted houses.
Valencia (Spain)
This lively city's port is 4 kilometres from the city, which has both ancient and contemporary landmarks. Worth visiting is the area of El Barrio del Carmen, where there is stunning Roman and Arab architecture and the old city gate of Torres de Serrano. The 15th-century Llotja de la Seda is a World Heritage Site and former silk trading centre with an elegant Hall of Columns. To capture Valencia's contemporary flavour, see the futuristic City of Arts and Sciences museum. The cathedral has works by Goya.
Valletta (Malta)
Arriving in Valletta, the site of its magnificent Grand Harbour is memorable. The old warehouses of the harbour area now contain a string of elegant restaurants and bars. Uphill is the impressive City Gate, leafy squares and some fine buildings including St John's Cathedral which displays a painting by Caravaggio. Traffic-free Republic Street is the main shopping area, and from the ramparts of Hastings Gardens there are wonderful sea views and a caf'.
Varna
Varna is a popular resort centred around the Golden Sands, a wide beach stretching for three kilometers. In the city, there is a Roman Spa, and the Theatre of Drama, built in the 1900's in Viennese style. The Museum of Art and History houses the 6000-year old Gold Treasure of Varna, excavated from the Varna Necropolis. Outside Varna is the interesting Aladzha Rock Monastery, decorated with 14th century frescoes.
Varna (Bulgaria)
Varna is a popular resort centred around the Golden Sands, a wide beach stretching for three kilometers. In the city, there is a Roman Spa, and the Theatre of Drama, built in the 1900's in Viennese style. The Museum of Art and History houses the 6000-year old Gold Treasure of Varna, excavated from the Varna Necropolis. Outside Varna is the interesting Aladzha Rock Monastery, decorated with 14th century frescoes.
Venice
The glorious buildings along the Grand Canal are a breathtaking sight - the ornate fa'ades of 15th century Palazzo Dario and Ca' d'Oro, the Rialto and St Mark's Square and Basilica. Venice is renowned for its Murano glass and for its exclusive shops. Upmarket boutiques run from Piazza San Marco to the Accademia Bridge and more unusual wares are available in Frezzeria.
Venice (Italy)
The glorious buildings along the Grand Canal are a breathtaking sight - the ornate fa'ades of 15th century Palazzo Dario and Ca' d'Oro, the Rialto and St Mark's Square and Basilica. Venice is renowned for its Murano glass and for its exclusive shops. Upmarket boutiques run from Piazza San Marco to the Accademia Bridge and more unusual wares are available in Frezzeria.
Vigo (Spain)
Ships visiting Vigo dock in the centre of the city adjacent to the palm-lined Avenida del Castillo. The old quarter is a maze of steep and winding streets where there are several plazas, including Pedra Square and its market and oyster stall. The Rua Real runs up from the port and is the main street, bordered by old fishermen's houses. Vigo has good beaches ' the Playa de Samil and the quieter bays of Santa Baia and Carril.
Villefranche (Nice/Monaco, France)
Villefranche is regarded as one of the most picturesque harbours on the Cote d'Azur, and its charming town is built on a wooded hillside. The artist Jean Cocteau decorated the 14th-century Chapelle St Pierre des Pecheurs with colourful scenes of gypsies and fishergirls. Cruise ships anchor in the bay for excursions to Nice, Cannes and Monte Carlo.
Volos (Greece)
The busy cruise, cargo and ferry port of Volos is surrounded by ancient sites and is situated on the Pelion Peninsula. To the west are the ruined acropolis of Dimini and of Sesklo ' the oldest in Greece - and across the Thessaly plains, the monasteries of Meteora, built on top of limestone pillars. Volos' waterfront and centre is full of shops, and bars and cafes are tucked away around St Nikolas Square.
Zadar (Croatia)
Once a dominant city on the Adriatic coast, picturesque Zadar is a historical treasure with the remains of a Roman Forum, the Church of St. Donat, the Romanesque Cathedral of St Anastasia, the Church of St Mary, and the Benedictine Convent. The city owns a permanent collection of church art known as 'The Gold and Silver of Zadar'. It has some good beaches, restaurants and taverns, serving up the local Maraskino liqueur.
Zakynthos (Greece)
Zakynthos is the most southerly of the Ionian islands. Its landscape is a mixture of mountains and plains, with a main town and port clustered around a waterfront of bars and white-cube houses. Navagio Bay is the beach famous for the shipwrecked hulk of the Panagiotis, and the offshore islet of Marathonisi is a nesting site for Caretta-Caretta turtles. The Blue Caves near Volimes are a major attraction and can be reached by local hire boats.
Corfu
Dubrovnik
Kos
Istanbul
Barcelona
Venice
Mykonos
Portofino
Rome
Monaco
Athens
Cadiz
Delos
Hydra
Hvar
Mamaris
Zakynthos
Dikkili
Ibiza
Palma
Ponza